Home » You Can Accomplish This Before Your Effing Head Explodes: Pork Loin with Pear, Squash & Couscous

You Can Accomplish This Before Your Effing Head Explodes: Pork Loin with Pear, Squash & Couscous

The posting might be a little spotty in the next week or so.  We’re out-of-town for a bit and I have a few other things I need to focus on. . .or at least things I SHOULD focus on. . .We’ll see.  Just know I’m not planning to blog slack indefinitely. . .Just trying to sneak in a few official end-of-summer and pre-baby hurrahs and stuff.

So for today in true slacker style. . .Here’s a fast dinner idea:

Yet another less-than-appetizing iPhone food photo. . .it tasted great.  You'll have to trust me on that. . .

Yet another less-than-appetizing iPhone food photo. . .it tasted great. You’ll have to trust me on that. . .

The original recipe can be found here.

But once they started talking about cooking down vinegar and pork juices in the pan, they pretty much lost me because I wanted the meal practically prepped long before I actually put it on the table. . .

HERE’S MY MODIFIED VERSION:

1.  Cook some plain regular or whole wheat couscous according to the package directions.  (We didn’t have quinoa).  Dump into a large serving bowl and set aside.

2.  Meanwhile, take a 1 or 2 lb pork tenderloin and place it in an oven-safe cooking dish (I use Lodge cast iron dutch oven type-pan-thing).  You can season the pork any way you prefer.  I just dumped some Dijon mustard over the top of ours.  Place the roast in a pre-heated oven.  I roasted mine at 350 degrees for a good hour or so.  Keep an eye on it so it doesn’t get all dry and icky.

3.  Add some olive oil to a skillet and heat it.  Add the white parts of the green onions and cook for a minute or two.  Then add the squash.  I couldn’t find a package of already prepped squash so I peeled and cut up a fresh butternut squash.  Add the squash to the skillet and allow it to soften a bit.  (A fresh squash will take longer to soften than pre-cooked).

4.  Once the squash looks a little tender, add the pears to the skillet and cook until barely softened.  No one wants a squishy pear. . .or squash. .  .Yuck.

5.  Add the contents of the skillet to the large serving dish with the couscous.  Also add the green parts of the green onions.  Stir gently.  Set aside (or refrigerate if your meal is hours away).

6.   Once cooked, allow the tenderloin to rest for a bit before carving it into 1 or 1.5 inch thick medallions.

7.  To serve:  Put a few spoonfuls of the couscous mixture on a plate, drizzle with some balsamic dressing and top with one or two pieces of pork.  Everything tastes fine warm or room temperature so if you have to refrigerate things, you might allow them to warm up for a half hour or so before serving and perhaps quickly heat the pork a bit in a pan on the stove-top if it’s also been refrigerated.

Wondering what the kid does while I cook?  Wonder no more. . .

Wondering what the kid does while I cook? Wonder no more. . .